The Kumars were landowners in a district of the United Provinces. They were rich by Indian standards and loyal to a foreign crown … but as a youth Duleep began to notice that … the callowest white-skinned boy doing his first year in the coveted civil service could snub them by keeping them waiting [outside] the sacred little bungalow from [which] wafted an air of effortless superiority. … Power, Duleep felt, lay not in money but in this magical combination of knowledge, manner, and race. … as a youth Duleep had acquired a good knowledge of [English] ... that he began to accompany his father on visits to petition the sub-divisional officer, and had the first intimations of the secrets hidden behind the bland face of the white authority. There grew in him a triple determination – to break away from a landlocked family tradition, to become a man who … granted favours, and to save [his younger sister] Shalini from ignorance and domestic tyranny … (p. 223, 225)

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